Accessing Multiple Intelligences in Science; Observations from the use of Narrative and Aesthetic Entry Points in a 3rd year Microbiology Module, Servicing Six Degree Programmes

O’Leary, Niall D (2008) Accessing Multiple Intelligences in Science; Observations from the use of Narrative and Aesthetic Entry Points in a 3rd year Microbiology Module, Servicing Six Degree Programmes. [Conference Proceedings]

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Official URL: http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000292571

Abstract

In this case study, the focused incorporation of narrative and aesthetic entry points proved highly valuable in bridging multi-disciplinary audience perspectives in the teaching of specialised theory.An important aspect of modern, third level education in the sciences is the impact of increasing levels of specialisation within disciplines. In response to continual disciplinary evolution, relevant academic departments must also expand their research and teaching portfolios accordingly, particularly in the 3rd and 4th year senior cycle of degree programmes.A common educational outcome of such specialisation is the servicing of degree programmes via multi-departmental collaborations. While the approach of pooling increasingly divergent disciplines may prima facie address academic program requirements, consideration must be given to the ability of students to intellectually access each specialist area/discipline. The 3rd year microbiology module considered here addresses the theory and application of micro-organisms in the fermentation industry. It is comprised of 18 lecture contact hours and a laboratory component involving 4 x 3 hr sessions. There are several teaching challenges associated with this unit, largely rooted in the fact that this specialized topic services several degree outlet programs. The unit is regarded as difficult by students and a 25% failure rate has occurred in the past.In a mixed teaching environment, such as that presented by MB3014, keeping the focus on a limited number of the available intelligences, may become exclusory in relation to “accessibility” of the specialised topic being taught.Based on comparative assessment of surveys collected for MB3014 since 2004, lecture content which was commonly highlighted by students as “difficult theory” was identified. For each of these theoretical elements, defined narrative and aesthetic/spatial entry points were designed by which to further assist students become centred/engaged in the theory.•

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Depositing User: National Forum
Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2015 08:42
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2015 20:17
URI: http://eprints.teachingandlearning.ie/id/eprint/3337

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