INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO MICROTEACHING AS A PEDAGOGICAL TOOL IN HIGHER LEVEL TEACHER TRAINING: A GMIT CASE STUDY.

Logue Collins, Pauline and Byrt, Enda (2010) INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO MICROTEACHING AS A PEDAGOGICAL TOOL IN HIGHER LEVEL TEACHER TRAINING: A GMIT CASE STUDY. In: LIN.

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Book-of-Abstracts 6th Annual LIN conference 2013.pdf

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Abstract

In GMIT Letterfrack (2009-2010) two programmes provided for teacher training in the technical subjects, namely, the B.Sc. Honours Degree in Design and Technology Education (DTE) and the Higher Diploma in Arts in Education (Technology). Both programmes incorporated peer microteaching (PMT). Furthermore, the DTE programme incorporated laboratory-based Microteaching with 6th class students, (LMT) while the H. Dip. In Arts in Ed. programme piloted an innovative approach, namely, school-based microteaching (SMT), with first year Junior Certificate students, in situ, in St. Paul’s Secondary School, Oughterard, Co. Galway. In line with the principles and practice of action research, and with a view to transformatory practice, the aims of the research were to examine the effectiveness of peer microteaching (PMT) in the DTE and H.Dip programmes, in GMIT Letterfrack, and to conduct a comparative analysis of peer, laboratory and in situ (school based) models of microteaching in the respective teacher training programmes in GMIT. An Action Research methodological framework was employed and research methods included online survey research with student-teachers in both the DTE and H.Dip in Arts in Education (Technology) programmes, and self plus shared reflection processes on the part of the microteaching tutors-researchers. The research found that: 1. the most effective microteaching learning experience is a combination of video and tutor evaluation, with experienced tutors; 2. school- based microteaching is significantly more effective than peer and laboratory microteaching as a learning tool; 3. microteaching was important in increasing self-confidence; identifying idiosyncrasies, understanding lesson planning and lesson structure, adopting active learning methods, improving communication skills, and consolidating the foundational skills required for Teaching Practice. Along with on-going action research reflection on the GMIT model of microteaching in each academic year, the research recommended: the prior debunking of false assumptions and perceptions regarding the process of microteaching and the adoption of a five stage approach: observation of best practice,an initial ‘Bite Size’ microteaching funlearning activity, peer microteaching, and two student microteaching experiences - the first at Junior Certificate Level and the second at Leaving Certificate Level.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Depositing User: National Forum
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2015 07:48
Last Modified: 04 Dec 2015 07:50
URI: http://eprints.teachingandlearning.ie/id/eprint/2761

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