TEACHING HISTORICAL RESEARCH - A THING OF THE PAST

Kelly, Jacinta (2010) TEACHING HISTORICAL RESEARCH - A THING OF THE PAST. [Conference Proceedings]

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Research Teaching Linkages Practice and Policy Conference Proceedings NAIRTL 3rd Annual Conference.pdf

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Abstract

Aim: The aim of this initiative is to facilitate students to learn in research mode about health promotion. Background: Since all research has a historical basis, it is proposed that undergraduate nursing students research a major health promotion problem from a historical perspective. In Ireland one of the fastest growing causes of death is chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, of which alcohol is a major contributory factor. It is reported that sophisticated alcohol advertisement has facilitated the recruitment of children and young people to the ranks of heavier drinkers in Ireland. Research problem: In Ireland alcohol advertising is regulated by the Drinks Industry; however successive reports recommend that when seeking to protect young people against unhealthy alcohol consumption present regulation of alcohol advertisement needs to be examined. Method: Using public archives of time-honoured breweries or distilleries, alcohol advertisements together with public and industry alcohol advertisement policy documents are subjected to the rigour of historical research and discourse analysis. Students analyse the content, words and pictures of alcohol advertisements from an identified time frame. Conclusions: It is anticipated that student interpretations of iconic alcohol advertisements and successive public health policy and documents can facilitate their learning about health promotion by research and aid discovery of areas for further alcohol research, policy and regulation.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Depositing User: National Forum
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 20:37
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2015 21:40
URI: http://eprints.teachingandlearning.ie/id/eprint/2636

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