The teaching for understanding framework (TfU) and the Sherlock Holmes investigative model (SHIM) for teaching undergraduate arts economics students: a pedagogical case

Blackshields, Daniel (2010) The teaching for understanding framework (TfU) and the Sherlock Holmes investigative model (SHIM) for teaching undergraduate arts economics students: a pedagogical case. [Conference Proceedings]

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Abstract

This research reports on the pedagogical use of the performance component of the Teaching for Understanding Framework (TfU) (Wiske, 1998, Blythe et al, 1998) through an Economics classroom adaptation of the investigative method of the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes (SHIM). This pedagogical experiment is designed to encourage the embracement of an expert problem-solving mindset and investigative method by undergraduate Economics students in a Bachelor of Arts programme when exploring ill-defined economic problems in academic and non-academic contexts. This pedagogical experiment facilitates putting into practice a cognitive apprenticeship programme of instruction by means of a series of inter-related student performances. The sequential development of these performances enables the teacher to 1) expose students to performing as investigators of economic phenomena – introductory performance; 2) develop a meta-level model of problem-solving through an in-depth interactive exploration of the investigative method of Sherlock Holmes derived from Conan Doyle’s stories and the Granada TV adaptation of these stories (1984-94) – guided inquiry performance; 3) encourage students to engage in reflection (Moon, 2007, 2001, 1999a) using the meta-level model to review their own performances as investigators of economic phenomena – guided inquiry performance. And; 4) require students to demonstrate their understanding of performing as an expert problem-solver in an observable way – culminating performances. It is proposed that this adaptation of the Teaching for Understanding Framework encourages the development of participants’ abilities as problem-solvers, facilitates a gradual lessening of teacher guidance for students and encourages the development of an intentional learning mindset and strategy on the part of the learner. This work is being conducted in part fulfilment of the author’s Masters in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
Depositing User: National Forum
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2015 19:59
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2015 19:59
URI: http://eprints.teachingandlearning.ie/id/eprint/1785

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